On Tuesday, June 18, 2024, at 6 p.m., the Washington County Republican Party will hold a special meeting: “Facts VS Fiction: The Northern Corridor” presented by Washington County Commissioner Adam Snow and Washington County Attorney Eric Clarke.

The meeting will be held at the Washington County Library St. George Branch located at 88 W. 100 S., St. George, UT 84770.

The Northern Corridor has long been planned to alleviate traffic congestion across the county, while at the same time creating beauty, wildlife and outdoor recreation opportunities.

This road project is essential to managing our area’s traffic congestion as well as protecting beloved open space such as the Bear Claw Poppy Trail and Moe’s Valley.

Congress promised the Northern Corridor. After taking office, the Biden Administration and far-left environmental organizations have been doing everything they can to delay and thwart the highway’s progress.

Please come and learn more about the project, and what you can do to help. You can also learn more about the project and its history on the 435 Podcast presented by Rob Macfalane, with guests County Attorney Eric Clarke and Courtney Sinagra (found at https://tinyurl.com/northerncorridor).

The Republican Party is a party by the people and for the people. The Republican Party appreciates the productivity of our citizens, affirms the infinite worth of all individuals, and seeks the best possible quality of life for all. The Republican Party invites all citizens to join in working together for a better Washington County.

The Washington County School District has officially opposed one of the "proposed alternate routes" for alleviating traffic in St. George. That particular plan would make St. George Boulevard a one-way street westbound and 100 South a one-way street eastbound, sending a heavy amount of traffic right by Legacy Elementary School.

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Securing Firearms: Expert Advice On Preventing Theft In St. George

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Utah loves its guns.

I do, too. if for no other reason than I feel like if I'm ever in a situation where a bad guy with a gun forces his way into my life, we would be on equal ground.

But taking care of my gun is a top priority.

Now I'm not talking about cleaning and oiling the firearm (though those things are important, too). I'm talking about making sure my weapon doesn't fall into the wrong hands -- of a child, of a criminal, of a person who doesn't know how to handle it.

That's why this disturbing trend in Southern Utah has me baffled and a little angry.

The St. George Police Department posted on social media today about a growing problem in our part of the state.

"Firearms are being stolen from vehicles at increasing rates so we wanted to remind you not to leave your firearms in your vehicles and offer a few safety tips to help keep your firearms safe!"

They then posted this chart:

Courtesy SGPD
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Some other suggestions/ideas:

  • Take note of and safely control the muzzle direction of firearms in vehicles. This is one of the main rules of gun safety and applies to the inside of vehicles as well as any other location
  • Be very careful if you must unload a firearm in the confined space of a vehicle so as not to have an accidental discharge. If your location allows, it is safer and easier to unload the firearm outside the vehicle
  • If you’re concerned about quick access to your firearm, many types of lockable safes allow for extremely fast access of your gun while at the same time helping to prevent unauthorized access
  • Secure the lock box to the vehicle, if possible. Some companies make custom concealed compartments for specific model vehicles
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The Truth Behind 'I'm Just Buzzed' And Other Alcohol Myths

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People who drink alcoholic beverages and then make the decision to drive a motor vehicle will make all kinds of excuses and rationalizations.

They'll say things like "I'm not drunk, just buzzed," or "I just had a little," or "I feel perfectly fine."

So to demystify the effects alcohol has on the average person, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration has put out a chart on what happens to someone who imbibes.

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Keep in mind that the blood alcohol legal limit in Utah is .05.

The chart also does not attempt to quantify how many drinks will get you to those BAC plateaus.

There are so many factors that go into figuring that out that most websites and experts defer when asked how many drinks make you legally drunk.

Factors that can affect an individual's BAC include:

  • Sex
  • Weight
  • Drink's alcohol level
  • Drink size
  • Food intake
  • Water/liquid intake
  • Weather
  • Medical conditions
  • Medication
  • Time

Plus, alcoholic drinks are very different when it comes to the amount of alcohol in each one. From the website gorelick-law.com, here are just a couple of the differences:

"When counting drinks to estimate BAC, it is important to understand how different the amount of alcohol can be based on the drink. According to the charts, one drink is equal to .06 ounces of 100% alcohol. This includes:

  • 1 1/2 ounces of 80 proof liquor;
  • 12 ounces of a 5% beer (Utah was 3.2% beer for 86 years, but changed to 5% in 2019)
  • 5 ounces of a 12% wine.

When people are out with friends or having drinks with dinner, it can be difficult to estimate drinks. Sharing a bottle of wine makes it hard to know how many drinks each person had, especially when the drinks keep getting topped off. Going to a brewery and sampling a number of beers may be deceptive as the small tasting glasses could be 4 to 6 ounces and some craft beers or barley wines can be 10% or higher."

Unfortunately, we've seen quite clearly in recent times how deadly and devastating drunk driving can be.

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LOOK: 11 tick-borne illnesses and what to watch out for during your outdoor adventures

Stacker compiled a list of 11 common tick-borne diseases in the U.S. and what symptoms to watch out for, using a variety of medical and government sources. 

Gallery Credit: Martha Sandoval

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